Massing – A big part of zoning codes

My engineer, Richard, and I sat at the Starbucks at Parmer and MoPac in Austin.  I sipped a cappuccino and he his hot cocoa.  We had just rolled up two sets of blueprints we were studying for upcoming projects.  Our small talk eventually turned to our latest projects and interesting encounters we had experienced dealing with the new crop of neophyte builders filling the local markets.

He shared with me one in particular where a home owner was taking a shot at becoming a general contractor.  He had paid an architect to design a two story house he intended to build.  He contacted Richard so he might obtain an engineer’s seal for the project.  Richard pointed out to the owner that he thought the building might exceed maximum height restrictions for the area.  The owner had no idea what he was talking about.  Richard recommended the owner contact a civil engineer and conduct a topographical survey for his lot.  He referred him to a friend who specializes in the field.  Later the owner called back in a huff.  He complained that the cost for the “topo” was in excess of $2,500.00.  Richard assured him the pricing was standard in the industry.  The owner complained that he had already paid the architect $3,500.00 for the plans and he didn’t want to add more cost to the design.  He asked if he could use topography from Google Earth.  Richard and I got a good laugh out of that one.  By the way, hire an architect at your peril if you have not enlisted a builder to help you identify potential zoning and code hazards for your project site. (read: Your Architect May be the Biggest Obstacle to Your Project.)

Austin Does Not Require Licensing for Builders

Ultimately, the owner signed a release alleviating Richard of any liability if the city declined the permit to build based on Massing restrictions.  A month later, the project was rejected on the basis of height restrictions.  Our conversation was interrupted when he received a call from a client.  I heard only one side of the conversation, but I was clear about the topic.  In my career I have run into a number of owners who watch too much HGTV or DIY TV.  Most of the builders I encounter are no better versed than the typical home owner in the specifics of my industry.

There is a very real danger in Austin, and many cities throughout the United States that are like Austin.  Remodelers and home builders are not required to obtain a license to practice here.  Austin is the fastest growing area in the United States based upon the latest statistics.  The demand for builders is unprecedented and the result is that “everyone” is in the construction business.  I have lost bids to ‘builders’ only to be called a few months later to complete the project started by an amateur trying to get rich quick in a desperate market.

The call I overheard involved Richard telling the home owner that the 2×12 header in his 16′ garage door frame in his new garage was not strong enough to carry the weight and it was sagging.  Richard had issued a correction letter to the builder and the owner as to a remedy for the structural error.  The owner complained that the builder had done the work and he was not answering his calls to fix the header.  The owner offered Richard more money to change his findings and pass the header.  Richard told him he had been an engineer for more than 30 years and he would not risk his reputation nor his practice to pass the header no matter the bribe offered.    When Richard hung up I asked him incredulously, “A builder installed a 2×12 header in a 16′ garage door?”  He shook his head and admitted that was the case.

A quick note for the inexperienced builder: When rating a structural component, more than the ability to support dead or live loads is considered.  The structural member is rated for its ability to withstand wind load to the opposite side of the structure.  Deflection range and structural sustainability are also a big part of the solution.

Fake Builders Muddy the Waters with Inexperience and Irresponsible Claims

This type of sad tale occurs more often than not.  The practice of fake builders building complicated projects outnumbers the projects built by bona fide builders.  Why is this?  The inexperienced builders are always cheaper because they count on subs to dictate pricing, or worse, they guess based upon what they feel is reasonable.  Additionally, the typical home owner does very little research before seeking bids.  I have met with home owners on numerous occasions where they had no idea what they felt was a realistic budget.

One of my prospective clients told me of a competitor who quoted a price that totaled less than my cost of the material required to build the project.  Another prospective client told me that they were concerned that they would be without power for 3 months during construction.  I asked them what would make them think that would ever happen.  They told me that a competing builder had told them that they had to cut off the power during the construction of a 300 square foot room addition for at least 90 days.  I informed them that the addition would be built well before we opened the outer wall of the home.  I assured them we would move the electrical panel and wire the new circuits weeks before we cut over the new power from their existing panel.  The power loss would be for 2 to 3 hours only, not 3 months.  Their suspicious looks troubled me.  You see, the ignorant competitor had convinced them of his knowledge and abilities and they were confused at the facts presented by a real builder.

Vetting your builder is the most hazardous part of your new project.  Please review these articles for tips to hire a reliable and experienced builder.

Related Articles:

10 Questions You Should Ask – Having Trouble Picking a Qualified Builder?
The First Appointment – Who Should come to Your Door?
Tips to Hire a Reliable Home Remodeling Contractor
Your Architect May Be the Biggest Obstacle to Your Project

Author: Craig Walker

Craig Walker has been in the building industry since 1980. He is the 4th generation in a family of professional builders. he is well respected both for his experience and his knowledge in the industry. He owns and manages ATX Design Build in Austin, Texas.

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